THE LINK'S TOP STORIES

CONCERNS OVER SEX TRAFFICKING AHEAD OF 2010 VANCOUVER WINTER OLYMPICS
A coalition of groups fighting against human trafficking has just launched a campaign to raise public awareness of potential sex trafficking ahead of the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver, with the slogan "Buying Sex is Not a Sport". The Link's West Coast reporter, Lorn Curry, has more on this story.
IMMIGRANT LANDING POINT TO BECOME MUSEUM
Pier 21, in Halifax, Nova Scotia, was the landing point for a million immigrants to Canada during much of the 20th century. Now it is to become a "national" museum dedicated to "immigration" in Canada. The Link's Carmel Kilkenny looks at what's in store for Canada's National Immigration Museum.
IMMIGRANTS ADDING NEW FLAVOUR TO THE CALGARY STAMPEDE
Calgary's annual celebration of all things cowboy and western is about celebrating the old cultures of Canada, both European and Aboriginal. But, as the Link's Frank Rackow reports, some newer Calgarians are adding their immigrant experience to the Stampede.
CALLING GREENPEACE SHIP IN THE ARCTIC
Marc Montgomery speaks to Paul Ruzycki, Canadian listener of The Link and first mate onboard the “Arctic Sunrise,” a Greenpeace ship carrying a team of international scientists studying the likely breakup of a huge ancient glacier in Greenland, which could result in one of the largest icebergs ever.
CANADIANS CHALLENGED TO HELP
Many people in Afghanistan lack the basics, including access to clean water, education and jobs. To try to improve their situation, the Canadian Government and Canadian aid groups working in the country are challenging Canadians to help. Kevin McCort, the president of CARE Canada, talks about what his agency is doing and how Canadians can help.
CANADA'S GOVERNOR GENERAL CAUGHT UP IN RAGING DEBATE OVER THE SEAL HUNT
While on a visit to the northern community of Rankin Inlet, Governor General Michaelle Jean took part in an aboriginal feast and ate some raw seal meat. The reaction has been visceral. The Link's Lynn Desjardins tells us about what the queen's representative did and the reaction to it.
MANITOBA ADOPTS LAW TO PROTECT TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS
The Canadian province of Manitoba recently passed a law aimed at protecting temporary foreign workers in the province. The law is a first in Canada. The Link's Frank Rackow reports on why Manitoba adopted the law and why not everyone in the province is happy about it.
EU TO BAN SEAL PRODUCTS
The European Union is likely to finalize a ban on seal products to go into effect in October. Although Canada's prime minister says he will vigorously defend the sealing industry, sealers are not holding out much hope. As the Link's Lynn Desjardins reports, the decision will have a serious impact on hunters off Canada's east coast and native communities in the north.
FORMER JUSTICE, UN OFFICIAL LOUISE ARBOUR MOVES ON
Be it at home in Canada, fighting for the rights of women in prisons, or overseas prosecuting war criminals before International Criminal courts, the Honourable Louise Arbour is one of Canada's best known champions of justice and human rights.
BUY AMERICAN PRACTICES HURT CANADA
Canada and the United States are the biggest trading partners in the world and Canadian prosperity depends heavily on exports to the United States. But, a recently adopted U.S. law that says stimulus money for infrastructure projects must be spent on products made in the States is hitting Canadian manufacturers hard.
SATELLITE BABIES
A study that will be published in a couple of weeks in Canada looks at the issue of Chinese newcomers who send their newborn babies back to China to be raised by their grandparents until the age of four or five.
CANADIAN FILMMAKERS ON TOUR WITH HEAVY-METAL LEGENDS
Canadian filmmakers and long-time heavy-metal fans Scot McFadyen and Sam Dunn have made a career of examining heavy metal music and its fans in their documentaries.
FIRST EVER MURDER VERDICT FOR SPREADING HIV VIRUS
Last week in Hamilton, Ontario, a jury rendered an historic verdict. For the first time in Canada, an HIV-positive man was convicted of murder for spreading the virus that causes AIDS. Johnson Aziga was found guilty of two counts of first degree murder and 10 counts of aggravated sexual assault.
TRANSPLANT CASE CAUSES CONTROVERSY
The case of baby Kaylee Wallace has been making headlines across Canada. Baby Kaylee was born with a rare brain disorder and was put on life support at the Toronto Hospital for Sick Children...
SWAT VALLEY CONCESSIONS PUT PAKISTAN IN HOT SEAT
It's been a turbulent week for Pakistan. Desperate to restore peace in the Taliban-dominated Swat Valley, the Pakistani government agreed to enforce strict Islamic law in the region.
EXPECTATIONS HIGH FOR SUMMIT
The Summit of the Americas begins today. Thirty-four heads of state from the countries of the Americas and the Caribbean are meeting in Trinidad and Tobago, including Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper.
POLITICIAN AIMS TO END ABUSES OF FOREIGN NANNIES
In 2001, Ontario's provincial government repealed it's Employment Agencies Act and did not replace it with new rules. That lack of regulation is giving rise to unscrupulous practices among some agencies that promise jobs and eventual permanent resident status to women who want to come to Canada as foreign caregivers and then charge fees as high as $10,000...
NEW BILL TARGETS MINING COMPANIES
Bill C-300 is a bill before parliament that would impose financial and other penalties on Canadian companies that do not follow international human rights guidelines or environmental rules in their overseas operations...
STUDENTS INITIATE FUND FOR PROJECT IN AFRICA
In 2000, at a United Nations conference of world leaders, eight goals were identified. They were dubbed the “Millennium Development Goals” and they include providing clean water, fighting diseases such as malaria in the world's poorest countries and the funding of so-called 'millennium villages' in Africa...
CANADIAN TEENAGERS RETURN TO TRADITIONAL VALUES
It may come as a surprise, but it seems that Canadian teenagers are behaving better than their parents did when they were teens...
CANADIAN SCIENTISTS IDENTIFY KITTEN-SIZE DINOSAUR
Researchers in Alberta have discovered fossils suggesting that tiny dinosaurs once roamed North America. They were gangly creatures and probably weighed less than a domestic cat. Scientists say this new discovery may change the way we think about the dinosaur era. Carmel Kilkenny speaks with Nick Longrich, a palaeontologist with the University of Calgary and one of the researchers who identified the tiny dinosaur bones.
JOURNALIST UNCOVERS COLOMBIA'S UNTOLD STORIES
Independent journalist Garry Leech spent the last ten years working in some of Colombia's most remote and dangerous regions. Uncovering stories that hadn't been told, Leech travelled into the country's conflict zones and also its coca growing areas. Carmel Kilkenny speaks with the journalist about his work and his new book, “Beyond Bogota,” about the eleven hours in August of 2006 when he was held captive by FARC, Colombia's largest, leftist guerrilla group.
PHOTO EXHIBIT HIGHLIGHTS IMMIGRANT SUCCESS
Many immigrants come to Canada with high hopes, big dreams and stellar qualifications. But despite their impressive professional backgrounds, many struggle to find a job in their field. But some do succeed and a new Ottawa photo exhibit called "20 Journeys: A Visual Essay of the Immigrant Experience" explores some of these stories. RCI's Toronto correspondent Lyne-Françoise Pelletier brings us the details.
MEDIA MELTDOWN
Like many other industries in Canada, public and private broadcasters are strapped for cash. Three major networks have announced they're cutting almost 1,600 jobs. Some are considering selling television stations and assets to try to make ends meet.
HISTORICAL RECOGNITION PROJECTS
The Canadian government is inviting ethnic groups to submit proposals for what's called "historical recognition projects." The program commemorates wartime measures and immigration restrictions that took place in Canada during WW I and WW II. Chinese, Indian, Jewish and Italian, Canadians are some of the largest groups affected, and more than $25 million is available to fund these projects. The Link's Valérie Morand has the details.
NORTH KOREA DILEMMA
Next month, North Korea is planning to launch what they are calling a communications satellite, which what many think is in fact a long-range missile test...
CANADIAN MUNICIPALITIES STRUGGLE TO HELP NEWCOMERS
A report by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities says underfunded municipalities across Canada are struggling to meet the day-to-day needs of newcomers. Michel Frojmovic, author of this report, joins Carmel Kilkenny on the phone from Ottawa to discuss his findings.




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